Sugidama Podcast Episode 04: From Kimoto to Sokujo and Back Again

Sugidama Podcast Episode 04: From Kimoto to Sokujo and Back Again

The process of making sake is really exciting! There are several sake brewing methods. The three main ones are kimoto, yamahai and sokujo (or sokujo-moto). In addition, there is bodaimoto even older but rediscovered only recently. Sake taste profile depends to a certain extent on the method used to make it. So if you know what each method means, you can make a better choice of sake.

All the methods differ by the way the starter is created. For example, in kimoto, the starter is churned for hours with special poles to turn it into a mush. While yamahai was invented after the kimoto and got rid of this churning.

While sokujo-moto slashed the production process by two whole weeks and produced clearer and more refined sake. On the other hand, Bodaimoto is a very ancient sake brewing method invented by Nara monks around the 12-14th century and was superseded by kimoto.

Kimoto, yamahai and bodaimoto sake is generally has richer and deeper taste full of nuances. It’s usually more acidic and sweeter compared to sake made by sokujo-moto method. But there are a lot of exceptions.

And the sake of episode is Gozenshu 1859 Prototype Junmai Muroka Nama Genshu Nakadori Bodaimoto from the brewery, which revived this ancient brewing method in the 1990s. Consequently, Gozenshu 1859 Prototype’s taste is rich and full of wild notes and overtones. It has higher acidity which offset the sweetness of the sake.

Episode’s Content:

  • What is shubo (moto)?
  • Acidic environment
  • Kimoto
  • Yamahai
  • Sokujo-moto
  • Bodaimoto and its rediscovery
  • How sake made with different methods taste
  • Sake of the episode: Gozenshu 1859 Prototype Junmai Muroka Nama Genshu Nakadori Bodaimoto

Kampai!

Sake mentioned:
Gozenshu 1859 Prototype
Tengu Sake
Sugidama Blog

Tengu Sake: A Look at Bodaimoto Starters

Leave a Reply